Categories
Reviews Theatre Reviews

Three Weeks: Bane 1, 2 And 3 (11/08/11)

Find the original article here.

As this reviewer sipped dryly from a cold glass of orange juice on the rocks, entertainment came knocking, and its name was ‘Bane’. A well written cinematic adventure, ‘Bane’ is a show that truly delights. Serenaded by the delicate riffs of live guitarist Ben Roe, Joe Bone—writer and one man performer—takes us through the day to day life of Bruce Bane, the typically gruff anti-hero. It is Bone’s skill at making so many characters come alive that enriches the performance; this stretches to even creating a dramatic car chase scene entirely without props. There are 3 “episodes” of Bane to watch, but if they are each as spellbinding as this one, then baby, you gotta see them all.

Categories
Reviews Theatre Reviews

Three Weeks: The Great Big Comedy Picnic (10/08/11)

Find the original article here.

More of a slight chuckle takeaway kebab than a great big comedy picnic, this group of stand-ups are lively, animated, and yet often lacking in the crucial department of honed and developed jokes. After a shaky start with compere Ian Fox, Mick Sergeant’s brash Geordie tone brings some comedy to the proceedings, but again falls short of fully entertaining. Toby Adams, the final comedian to play during this show, tries a different approach by adopting the guise of an at times completely barmy character. His act engaged a little more with the audience, but when a comedian is forced to crack a joke about the audience not laughing, something has gone wrong. Sadly, this was definitely the case here.

Laughing Horse @ Espionage, 5 – 28 Aug, 5.00pm (6.00pm), free, fpp84.
tw rating 2/5

Categories
Reviews Theatre Reviews

Three Weeks: Cul-de-Sac (10/08/11)

Find the original article here.

Alan Bennett meets ‘The League of Gentlemen’ in this recognisable, yet in turns demented, tale of the lives of cul-de-sac curtain-twitchers. Whilst the plot becomes increasingly over-the-top when we discover all is not as it seems in the sac, there are moments of precision and wit in the writing. One neighbour mentions that he can understand why his wife has left him for another living nearby, because they do, after all, “have a tennis court”. The acting is as polished as the neighbour’s best china, with the only cracks being in the aforementioned leap of credulity that the script takes, but not even this is enough to damage such an intelligent parody of suburban life.

Pleasance Courtyard, 5 – 28 Aug (not 15 & 22), 3.15pm (4.15pm), £8.00 – £10.00, fpp252.
tw rating 4/5

Categories
Reviews Theatre Reviews

Three Weeks: Mythbunking (10/08/11)

Find the original article here.

Alan Shearer is a deity in Peru. Gary Barlow has bionic legs. These are just some of the surreal myths circulated by a society called ‘Mythbunkers’ who are now ostensibly on the lookout for new members. Through entertaining media such as video clips, live anecdotes from our two friendly neighbourhood mythbunkers and even a sing-along with the audience, we’re educated on elements such as the history of myths and how to spread them. The jokes have a habit of being as makeshift as the props used but there’s a warming charm from geeky character, John, which mostly makes up for it. Poking fun at myths and facts alike, ‘Mythbunkers’ doesn’t take itself too seriously, and is all the more refreshing for it.

Underbelly, 5 – 28 Aug (not 16), 1:10pm (2:10pm), £7.50 – £10.00, fpp123.
tw rating 3/5

Categories
Reviews Theatre Reviews

Three Weeks: Samira (09/08/11)

Find the original article here.

Promising a delicate display of live theatre and video scenes, this play sadly disappoints. It follows the central character Samira as she is interrogated after her initiation of a terrorist attack, and while the ambitious marrying of Samira’s live on-stage responses with pre-recorded scenes occasionally hits the emotional mark, it often veers into melodrama. Additionally, these video scenes hinder the audience’s ability to relate to the other characters, as they appear too detached from anything happening on stage. It is also a shame that in the live scenes Samira can only react to pre-recorded questions, as there are glimpses of strong acting that could have worked better with on-stage presences. The concept is all that proves intriguing, while all else falls short.

C soco, 4 – 29 Aug (not 15), 3:55pm (4:55pm), £7.50 – £10.50, fpp295.
tw rating 2/5

Categories
Reviews Theatre Reviews

Three Weeks: Principle Parts (09/08/11)

Find the original article here.

It began with a gunshot, but what was running through the minds of the Black Hand gang before the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand? An onstage group of musicians skilfully play feverish strings and deep drum patterns as ‘Principle Parts’ unfolds. One standout scene interweaves the frantic comedy of the blundering gang members with the realisation of the danger at stake for all, should they fail. Very occasionally the tempo falls flat as the characters muse over the mundane and there appears to be little reason behind why one actor plays both parts of assassin and Archduke, but overall this is a fun-filled nod at history that aims high and doesn’t miss its mark.

C soco, 4 – 29 Aug (not 15), 2.05pm (3.05pm), £6.50 – £9.50, fpp289.
tw rating 4/5
[ljc]