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Three Weeks: Samira (09/08/11)

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Promising a delicate display of live theatre and video scenes, this play sadly disappoints. It follows the central character Samira as she is interrogated after her initiation of a terrorist attack, and while the ambitious marrying of Samira’s live on-stage responses with pre-recorded scenes occasionally hits the emotional mark, it often veers into melodrama. Additionally, these video scenes hinder the audience’s ability to relate to the other characters, as they appear too detached from anything happening on stage. It is also a shame that in the live scenes Samira can only react to pre-recorded questions, as there are glimpses of strong acting that could have worked better with on-stage presences. The concept is all that proves intriguing, while all else falls short.

C soco, 4 – 29 Aug (not 15), 3:55pm (4:55pm), £7.50 – £10.50, fpp295.
tw rating 2/5

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Reviews Theatre Reviews

Three Weeks: Principle Parts (09/08/11)

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It began with a gunshot, but what was running through the minds of the Black Hand gang before the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand? An onstage group of musicians skilfully play feverish strings and deep drum patterns as ‘Principle Parts’ unfolds. One standout scene interweaves the frantic comedy of the blundering gang members with the realisation of the danger at stake for all, should they fail. Very occasionally the tempo falls flat as the characters muse over the mundane and there appears to be little reason behind why one actor plays both parts of assassin and Archduke, but overall this is a fun-filled nod at history that aims high and doesn’t miss its mark.

C soco, 4 – 29 Aug (not 15), 2.05pm (3.05pm), £6.50 – £9.50, fpp289.
tw rating 4/5
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Three Weeks: Tis I, Shakespeare the Brit (9/08/11)

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Beginning with the clichéd scene of a lonely, half-drunken writer sitting at his desk in despair, ‘Tis I, Shakespeare the Brit’ soon rouses itself from slumber with the very literal arrival of, naturally, Shakespeare. The bard comes knocking to enlist the help of the scholarly protagonist to help counter all the suspicions that he never actually wrote any of his own work. Plenty of comedy is generated by the chemistry between the bard and his sycophantic follower, although one or two jokes seem slightly shoe horned in, especially one concerning phone hacking. Whilst the ending is fairly inevitable, the witty exchanges make it unlikely you’ll feel the need to sleep, perchance to dream, during this performance.

C eca, 4 – 29 Aug, 12.50pm (1:50pm), £6.50 – £9.50, fpp304.
tw rating 3/5